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university where he teaches constitutional law at the college and the law school. he received both his b.a. and j.d. from yale and serves as an editor for the yale law's journal. after clerking for stephen breyer when he was judge of the u.s. court of appeals for the first circuit professor amar joined the faculty of yale in 1985. professor amar is a coeditor of the leading constitutional law casebook, decision-decision- making and is the author of several other books including the constitution and criminal procedure, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution a biography and most recently america's unwritten constitution, the president's and decibels we live by. the honorable clarence thomas has served as an associate justice of the supreme court of the united states for nearly 21 years. he attended conceptual cemetery and received an a.b. from the college of the holy cross and his j.d. from yale law school. he served as an assistant attorney general of missouri from 1974 to 1977, an attorney with the monsanto company from 77 to 79 and legislative assistant t
with "fortune" magazine calls the crisis in antitrust, which is in there, they showed it to their outside law firm, sent back word that i was not a lawyer, i was a fraud, because lawyers don't write that way. so they -- [laughter] they got nervous and called my old law firm and was assured that i was a lawyer. [laughter] but i don't really admire much legal style of writing. there's no need for it. you can express the ideas of a law or the ideas about the culture in a variety of ways without any jargon and perfectly plain english that anybody can understand. and that, i have to do that in those books because a lot of those articles in there appeared in popular journals. >> host: yeah. it did seem very, the articles were very clear and not typical of legal writing. um, i wanted to ask you, president obama's talked about the need for judges with empathy. and i wallet today ask you, have -- i wanted to ask you, have judges strayed from the role they should be playing, and what do you think of president-elect obama's plans for appointing judges? >> guest: well, i'm a little -- i would be even mor
contravention of the fourth amendment and complete contravention of the law at that time. as i'm sure and many of my colleagues will certainly recall this was revealed to the american public four years later when it was reported in "the new york times" in 2005. and in response after years of back and forth contentious debate, congress passed the fisa amendments act, the bill that we are considering on this floor today. we're considering a reauthorization. this law gave the government new surveillance authorities, but it also included a sunset provision to ensure that congress examines where the law is working and the way it was intended. now, the debate we're having right now on this floor is that reexamination. i will just note that i think it's unfortunate that we're doing this at the last second. we have known that this intelligence law is going to expire for years. it was laid out for a multiyear span. and certainly, it is irresponsible for this chamber to be debating this bill under a falsely created pressure that it needs to be done without any amendments in order to match the bill from
? >> guest: there was a common law right in england allowing people to have firearms for self-defense and other purposes issue and that right, common law right, traveled across the ocean with the colonists, and they needed the guns here, whereas in england, mostly, they did not. people soon came to have the facility, and knowledge of firearms, and, of course, as we all know, it produced the results of victory against the most powerful military country in the world at the time in the revolutionary war. >> host: i want to talk about that a little bit, and, again, people have hazy views on history, and, you know, it comes from movies or tv a lot of the time. when we had the revolutionary period, what was the role of guns in these militias or requirements that we talked about? >> guest: well, george washington didn't think a lot of the militia. he grouched about it at times, but he also made remarks that allowed how the militia was a useful thing to have and couldn't have bill the army without the existence of the militia and people in the militias, and more importantly, volunteer
at the university of colorado law school. she talked about gender discrimination cases and her own experiences as a woman law school graduate in the early 1960s. this conversation is about an hour, 15 minutes. .. >> we are so grateful to have you here, phil, for all your work. [applause] >> we have several regions here, two of whom are grads of our fine law school, michael and jodi your and irene is here also i believe. and any other regions are here, we thank you for all your support and your spirit. we do very much believe in engaging with the community come and we want to continue to do so in so many ways. i would echo what melissa hart said, and very importantly acknowledge the leadership in terms of the energy she brought to the white center, this lecture was her brainchild. the constitution of the activities were brainchild, and recognizing that under the board of regents, the chase award given from the president's office given to melissa hard for her work in community service. so i want to acknowledge mullah so hard. [applause] -- melissa hart. >> and finally, all of you make such a dif
and graduation. it breeds hypocrisy within the school and encourages a scoff law at tuesday among college officials. papers over the prop of why so many latinos and blacks are academically competitive, and it gives states and schools involved in unsavory activities -- like decides which racial minorities will be heard and which ones not -- and how much blood is needed to establish group membership. and i didn't want even mention mismatch. -- i didn't even mention mismatch. [laughter] the mismatch book, in addition to o giving chapter or and verse and ample, irrefutable documentation for why this is a real problem also touches on some of these other problems that i've listed too. you add all those up, okay, and it seems to me that it's a lot stronger than the educational benefits from these random interracial conversations we might be having more of if we use racial preferences in admissions. okay. well, let me wrap up with one sort of happy note, but then one not so happy note. it seems to me -- and i think it ought to seem to the justices -- that one reason why we ought to end this nonse
, national security law on both sides. we are very pleased to announce the book cover has received the 2012 american graphic design award and it is our hope not only will the outside win an award but perhaps the inside. .. critical and important debates. we have one of the senior members working in the back. we want to think jack for being here and all the support that you have given, not only in the book but our committee since you have joined the bar association. appreciated. i speak on behalf of all of our committee. we are pleased to say that we have a number of positive responses. the former national counterintelligence executive, the director, bob bryant, one of the best of the key issues of the national security arena. what makes a stand that is the bipartisan dialogue, intellectual rigor, timeliness, and readability. a must read for practitioners and policy makers and the general public. i take with of would like to do that this point is sort of explain how the book came about. the person going task to do that is bernie horowitz. as briefly explain the process by which he decided to
again to be i knew i had to put everything aside and write it. >> you're a law professor correct? so the courtroom drama part, did that come easy to? >> i don't know, for me no novel is really easy to write but it is true, this would fit into some of my interests as a scholar. i write about presidential power. i write about war. i've written a lot about lincoln over the years, and so taking that come those ideas, put them into fiction but if you think about it, lincoln did do things during the civil war that raise interesting questions. lincoln did suspend habeas corpus. in some cases subject to the military court-martial. my notion was what if a different process used for political reasons, nevertheless got us into the war as a way of trying to get them out of the way. >> how much political pressure was abraham lincoln under in early 1865? >> lincoln was the most talented politician i believe whoever inhabited the -- not the oval office. there was a one, but the presidential office at the time. he had to balance these competing factions of his own party. he had to run the civil war
and that right common law right the colonists the needed the guns here whereas most england they didn't, and so people soon came to have an enormous facility and knowledge of firearms and of course as we all know it proves the result of victory against the most powerful military country in the world with of the revolutionary war. >> host: i want to talk about that a little bit, and again i think people get different views in history, and it comes from movies or tv a lot of times. but when we have the revolutionary period what was the role of guns in the militia or these requirements that we talk about? >> guest: george washington didn't think a lot of the militia. he growled about a lot of times but also made some remarks that aloud how the militia was a useful thing to have. they could have built the continental army with the existence of the militia and people that have been in the militia and more importantly the volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was the key. >> host: so people were using these on the frontier protecting the indians, native americans, hunting certa
history is and how important it is to know. [applause] >> next from the georgetown university law center in washington, d.c., a discussion on the supreme court. it's about one hour and ten minutes. >> hello, everyone. i want to welcome you to today's program, which features an all-star lineup of authors who will be discussing their most recent books on the supreme court. i am a professor here at georgetown and executive director of the supreme court institute. it's a real privilege for the supreme court institute to host this event and i would like to thank our deputy director for putting it all together. before i turn the program over to our moderator i would like to remind everyone that after the program we have a reception following in which he will get a chance to have all of your newly purchased books signed by the authors and have a word or two with the authors hopefully coming in as you can see, we have food and beverage, so please stick around after the program. with that, i would like to introduce our moderator for today's program. tony really needs no introduction at all sali w
. although knobloch or the constitution guarantees equal protection of the law, and the outlaws the whole purpose of it the 14th amendment was to outlaw racial standards. that seems pretty straightforward. there was an act of 1981 that been racial discrimination, including in regards to college tuition. it sounds pretty straightforward. think of those things not mean what they say. there is an exception in this area. you would think, well, gee, it would be an exception. it would be an exception to the principle of racial discrimination that is pretty clearly there in the law. the federal branch have spoken to that. it must be pretty strong and undeniable. it must be something like, you know, it helps us identify someone who is about to set up a nuclear bomb in new york city or something like that. it is very compelling. well, the argument is that if you use racial determination for college admissions, it is likely that there will be somewhat more -- somewhat more of unrehearsed, interracial conversations are in especially among students. under the african-american kids and a latino kids w
as a nigger or black people as niggers may be in violation ofhe law creating a hostile workplac and thereby making yourself t subject to liability under thetl 1964e call or under the civil-rights law of 1964. so, under certain circumstancess you can would make yourself -- which subjects yourself to legal liability, or another way. if you commit violence and in the indication of a -- the commission of a violent act refer to people using the n-word, you might be subject to hate law legislation, and thereby not only be prosecuted for assault or whatever violent act you have committed, but you might subject yourself to an enhanced penalty by running afoul of state hate laws. so, under certain circumstances, yeah, you would be in violation of the law. generally speaking, though, because of the strong shielding power of the first amendment, people, for instance, comedians or writers, can use the n-word and not have to fear the law, though you might have to fear a public opinion which itself can be a very powerful force. >> host: is that the near word versus citing word? >> host: the law of homici
of goes to at what's at the heart of constitutionalism and rule of law, and looking back at the list of things that you listed. in the course of that conversation after a long discussion about the constitutionalism, a center. essentially blackmun turns to moyers and says it's really the preamble that breathes life into the constitution. and i wondered whether that's a point of view that you hold and whether you think it has relevance in the situation we're talking about now. >> , preamble, we the people and united states, et cetera, i used to be able to quote it, i don't think i can now. anyway, it's written down. and the preamble is important saying we the people. but is not the only thing. and i say that because i do think, i had a very interesting conversation in china, i thought. i've gone there twice. the first time was a few years ago, maybe eight or 10, when we went to beijing and then we went to shanghai. and in shanghai we are asked to meet with a group of businessm businessmen, and these businessmen have all been involved in the.com. they lost a lot of money. most of them h
's mentioned, he was a president back then, too, of harvard law review. so he is used to holding the reins of power. a chief justice also holds the reins of power, the only difference is that a chief justice must hold them lightly, lest he discover they're not attached to anything. [laughter] perhaps the faculty feels the same way about a university president. [laughter] nevertheless, i know from long and personal experience that david brings to rice a special vision, talent and leadership. this school is fortunate to have him at the helm, and i know he feels blessed to be there. i'm especially pleased that david invited me to visit rice as part of the centennial celebration of the university's founding. and i extend my sincere congratulations to the trustees, the faculty, students and alumni on your first great century. the founding of a new university is always an historic occasion, but the founding iserrer moanny -- ceremony for rice was truly extraordinary. i went back to read the newspaper accounts from october 1912 that reported the event. the papers reported that the distinguished f
to commissions, committees, boards, conferences or interparliamentary conferences authorized by law, by concurrent action of the two houses or by order of the senate. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent that from friday, december 21, through thursday, december 27, the majority leader be authorized to sign duly enrolled bills or joint resolutions. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: first of all, mr. president, i appreciate your filling in kind of on an emergency basis to preside. it's not often we get one of the senior members of the senate to preside and i'm grateful to you. it makes it so much easier on everyone else. i ask unanimous consent that when the senate completes its business today, it adjourn until 12:00 p.m. on monday, december 24, 2012, for a pro forma session only, with no business conducted, and that following the pro forma session, the senate adjourn until 10:00 a.m. on thursday, december 27. following the prayer and the pledge, the journal of proceedings be approved to date, the morning hour be deemed expired,
or may not know because of the long history of copyright law in the library of congress this jefferson building is quite literally the house that copyright bills. let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished . let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished panel that we have. to my left is tom allen, former congressman from maine and chief executive officer of the association of american publishers. to his left his james shapiro, who is a professor of english and a shakespearean scholar and an author and vice president of the author's built, a professor at columbia university. thank you for coming down from new york. did you also come down from new york? from washington. you are everywhere. then we have peter jaszi, professor of copyright law at the washington college of law, american university, also an author. i will say also peter would not want me to, recently given the great honor by his colleagues at the washington college of law to have a lecture named after him. congratulations and thank you for joining us. [applause] so our topic is copyright and the book. very
with legislation with the civil-rights act was enacted into law the. >>host: at what point* did you become aware of the civil-rights commission? >>guest: i became aware when i was in a graduate program they would ask me if i would in the '60s and '70s. they were very good reports. i was very much aware. and the commission asked me to ask if i would write something with abortion rights and let history had been and i did a report for them. >>host: what is your history? >> what to stage where you from? >> i am from asheville my family and their relatives are there. when i went to howard university for seven to the history department with a ph.d. then to the law school to do legal history. then you had to get both degrees but not at the same time. but now that you can. [laughter] i had to do one then the other. >>host: did you come north to graduate school on purpose. >>guest: howard. absolutely. with those negros is we were called i went to howard. that made sense but one of the first to announce that was black in the ph.d. program. they said they were surprised to see me. onetime bay negro came ye
, the laws of egypt definitely forbids this underage marriage. the laws of nigeria forebit this conduct. turned out in fact this was a man, a serial pedophile, gets a younger one. the media scream they're heads off, the women's organizations scream they're head off but that man today, the senator, never prosecuted. on the other hand he claimed, he said anything that the koran says i should do, i will do. anything the koran says i shouldn't do, i won't do. and nowhere does the koran say i cannot marry an underage girl. the laws of two countries are stronger -- superior to the nation's constitution. of course, screams and articles and so on, but important things, until today not been prosecuted. so they have no moral authority to promulgate an edict like this. >> another question here. yes, gentleman six rows back, and thin mirian moorehead. >> thank you, doctors. i feel that we can say the -- one of the things you find around the world, about religion, most countries that actually kept original religion, compared with the development right now, kept their religion or developed far superi
the lawful property of southern families, namely their slaves. and there was no compromise that could erase those tensions. they had been trying to compromise the issue of slavery for three generations. they compromised over slavery when they wrote the constitution. they compromised over slavery when they passed the northwest -- opening the upper midwest. they compromised over slavery in 1820 with the famous missouri compromise. they compromised over slavery in 1850 with the fugitive slave act and in 1854 with the kansas/nebraska act. the dred scott opinion of the supreme court was supposed to be compromised, resolving the issue of slavery. they had tried and tried and tried to compromise. it had not worked and that is why the crisis came. if one nation sharing the same congress, operating under the same laws, could not compromise the issue, how could two nations side-by-side, sharing these vital arteries of commerce and communication, how could they hope to resolve the issue? and what's more, lincoln understood that if secession managed one success there would not be illogical into it. we
, it defies the laws of logic. i have been sitting there across the table from you forever. i have kept my eyes peeled, and there never has been a pin prick of any kind. once more, this wacky stuff, you crawl space and time has never existed either. nor will it ever exist. why is that? because nothing comes of nothing. zero upon zero equals zero. the idea that the basic facts could ever change is ridiculous. it defies the first law. the law of the conservation of energy. every respectable scientists will understand, why live, in exasperation and trying to get simple objects across to you, infinitely smaller than a pinprick infinitely shows its head. suddenly, a call of singularity. this just does not make sense. act as if nothing has happened. meanwhile, that pinprick blows up so fast that it makes me dizzy. and it has three properties that never existed before. three properties that are common sense prevailed should not exist. those properties are time, space, and speed. how in the nonexistent world to the nothingness pull this off? the pinprick keeps coming out. a space-time manifold occ
to be the safest place of the nuclear storage but under the law they had to get the approval of a local community and so before the decision was made, a survey was done to the residents of this small town in the thrift would you vote to approve this despite the risks 51% said yes and then they asked the second question, a sweetened the deal. they said the parliament chooses your time for the nuclear waste and offers to pay in hot competition for the risk each resident of the town an annual sum of money at the the cut to $8,000 a year then would you accept it and then how many do you think said yes? 90, 80? other guesses it went down from 51% to 25%. the number fell in half. why should this be? why should this be from the standpoint of the standard economic reasoning if you offer people money to do something, the number of people willing to do that should increase. why did it fall in half? what was happening to you think? host >> [inaudible] >> the risk. so if they are being paid money their thinking to themselves this must be riskier than i thought. they are paying the money to do this. well, tha
of privileges. whether criminal law or otherwise. other privileges as well. as an office, we were required to be under certain things. but i really touch on areas that i did not have to run my butt by the treasury department in any way shape or form. they weren't happy about the hard truth that i tried to deliver in this book. so it really wasn't -- i really didn't do anything or go in any of those areas. you know, sometimes a little frustrating because there were things i wanted to explore, but i thought it was safer and easier to come nowhere close outline. i felt i could tell the story without having to just go there. so i think that was it. next steps, right now, i'm teaching at nyu school of law. which i am just enjoying and loving. they were so supportive of the process of me writing this book. i'm not sure what's next. but it's been a crazy and wonderful ride. even though i had a hard time in washington in a lot of respects, i would never give back a second of the time. serving the country and went out to do,, i feel blessed and fortunate. working with the amazing men and women who
service of the mine which is illegal by the way under the u.s. law. they were busted by the clinton administration, stripped of insurance, but they have henry kissinger on the door, so they got everything worked out. this has 18,000 people working at 15,000 feet. straight down through glacier. it's the biggest gold mine and basically the biggest cotton - the world. but, people are shocked. there's a huge battle going on because they're putting 300,000 tons of waste every single day in the two rivers without, like in america you can't do that. but there you just play with on and it doesn't matter. so, what you are asking is to be pushed off and if you do you push it puts a to china who doesn't care. yeah it's much worse. at the bottom line is america is actually good about mining in terms of world standards we have the highest standards really of safety the you are talking about huge amounts of toxic metals that they admittedly don't know how to control. it is in the they don't want to be and i do not think they are evil by nature they just don't know how to do at. in arizona may be
this legislation the civil rights act of 64 and 65 were enacted into law. >> host: at what point did you become aware in your life of the civil rights commission? >> guest: i became aware when i was in a graduate program at the university. someone came and asked me if i would work on a project they had. post the 60s, 70s? >> guest: yet, and i used some of the reports gazeta reports they did were very good reports and some historical research that i did. so i was very much aware of them. finally, by the time that roofie wade was decided, the commission asked me if i would write something as a history of abortion rights for them and how that all played out in what the history had had other way back to england and so on and i did a report for them. >> host: what is your history? where are you from? >> guest: i am from nashville, tennessee. my family and relatives are all still there. i went to pearl high school and i went to howard university and then i went to the university of michigan. first the history department where he got a phd and then i went to the law school. i wanted to do legal histor
did, yes. c-span: and graduated from law school by the time you were--what?--20? >> guest: i was--no, i was close to 22 when i was... c-span: twenty-two? >> guest:...out of law school. c-span: how--how long did it take you to get out of stanford? >> guest: well, i finished my major in three years, but i needed some additional credits to count for the undergraduate degree. and i applied to the law school for early admission at the law school, and to my great surprise, they took me. so my first year of law school counted as credits for my undergraduate degree, and so then i had two additional years of law school. c-span: what were you like when you were 16? >> guest: ignorant and naive. c-span: about what? >> guest: well, about what life for a woman lawyer might be like, for one thing. it never occurred to me that there weren't women lawyers out there and that it might be hard to get a job as one. i never thought about that. c-span: you know, i kept thinking when i read the book that your life here at the supreme court might be--that your life on the ranch might even be a metaphor
meaningful oversight. beyond the straightforward application of the law to specific and sometimes highly classified circumstances, fisa court rulings may include substantive interpretations of governing legal authorities. as is true in every court called on a construed statutory text, fisa applications are influential in determining the contours of the government' surveillance authorities. unlike specific collections which are properly classified in many instances, i believe that the fisa court's substantive legal interpretation of statutory authorities should be made public. a hallmark of the rule of law which is a bedrock principle upon which our nation is founded, mr. president, is that the requirements of law must be made publicly available, available for review, available for the scrutiny of the average american. the merkley-lee amendment establishes a cautious and reasonable process for declassification consistent with the rule of law. its procedures are limited in three key respects: first, the pathway for declassification applies only to the most important decisions that include
. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year perio
there, you have to enforce the law. but you have now, and i don't blame people who show up here. if we refuse to control the border and identify who you are and refuse to police ourselves refuse to do everything if you're here illegally, it's hard for me to tell you you're or taken advantage of the richest venture in the world. he seems to be saying please come and exploit me. to some extent we have to reestablish the rule of law. the only point to try to make during the debate that had a significant impact on our side in solidifying the degree to which people adopt positions that made no sense. two points. one is for not going to deport grandmother's. some of you may disagree with that, but if you look at this country as a whole, the idea behind grandmother's, the churches will protect them. their families will protect them. and they cannot pin. conservatives should not write laws that are fantasies. i didn't say i'm for people who come here illegally, but i'm prefiguring out a patch of residency to get them to pay taxes, get them to be within the law, get them to be not exploited and
or subsidies because the law limits those to people with incomes 100% or above. having spoken to my colleagues at kaiser about this issue who followed this issue more carefully than i have, they said cygnus -- secretary cbs has said these individuals would not be subject to mandate penalties if they lived in a state that did not expand medicaid and selling this coverage gap. >> would they be uninsured? >> presumably that would be -- >> the question really, do we know how many people could potentially be uninsured? >> we don't really have an estimate since we didn't factor this, our analysis was conducted prior to the supreme court for consideration of the case and the supreme court decision, but i believe there was another analysis done of this issue by the center for american progress. i am not sure which. there have been some recent analyses of this question looking at numbers potentially for those individuals who are living in states that have expressed lack of interest in expanding their medicaid program. >> while i have you at the microphone there are a few other technical questions. 100%
family. in the middle, to older folks in the middle on the left is jim's attire from his father-in-law and next to him, his wife, rio, bill manbo's mother-in-law. they were both immigrants from japan. trained as a mechanical draftsman, but did a number of different jobs and he came to the united states and ultimately took up farming in the mid-1920s in the work of the california, southeast of downtown los angeles. they had three children. on the right is the youngest child. that is eunice. she was about 16% even this photograph. on the other hand on the left is mary, who then became mary manbo. on the left is the photographer's wife, mary manbo. and then is bill and mary sun, really. also called bill, that he was called billy and the family. he came in 1940s if this is some 10 shots in 1943. is three years old touching his toy airplane. mary went to the frank wiggins school as well. she was studying to become a seamstress. she became a seamstress and it's costing design for theater come any among other jobs. and there was a third child, a boy. by 1941, cne who is not pictured in this p
required. i mean, some of my law school classmates, roommate, they say i was completely inept in making anything. ironic i wrote a book on manufacturing. i can write a brief, but i can't assemble a machine. it doesn't mean my skills is different or any better, its own market value, but somehow we frowned upon or don't appreciate the complexity of the skills required in the trade, and i think we need to both educate on technology and also have a real respect for how difficult the jobs are. >> you mentioned the importance of sustaining efforts to technology oriented education. which of our other current manufacturing facilitation initiatives do you think are really critical for us to sustain and what new initiatives would you suggest in order to stimulate our entrepreneurial success? >> great question. the partnership, a small program, but it's not well-known at the department of commerce, and what they do is they help companies figure out how to become more efficient. they figure out how to economize their production process or how to customize products, how they can find a path to profi
father-in-law died inherited three slaves. the first lady's great great grandmother and she ended up in a rough rural community in georgia, the vast majority of people were not slave voters, white men worked the fields along the slaves they own if they owned annie and it was quite a different experience than the one we often think about. >> it was quite a different experience and i really enjoyed reading about the people of that day, how she worked the fields and the men who owned her worked the fields. i know that you were not able to determine the relationship between millvinia and the men who owned her. and i also know, code of silence. she never talked about it and her descendants never talked about it. i noticed the same thing in her own family and other families as well. it is about wilkerson who wrote about the great migration, the same code of silence in her family. what is up with that code of silence? >> this is a painful chapter of american history for many families. so i think at the time, people knew. it would have been very clear to people. the people i met and intervie
it scandalous, grover cleveland's best friend and law partner was a guy named oscar fulsome. cleveland was born in new jersey and he spent most of his career in buffalo. he was a very successful lawyer and he and oscar were partners. they practice law together and they went out together and they would go out drinking and being together and it appears they enjoyed the services of maria halpern and together so when maria halpern and gets pregnant she has a son and neither knew who the father was. maria complicates things by naming the child oscar cleveland oscar fulsome had been married and had a daughter, frances. wheatland was a bachelors of cleveland accepted the responsibility and put the child in an orphanage. here's the other part of the scandal. oscar fulsome dies a few years later in a carriage accident. he is thrown from an apparently breaks his neck. he leaves a widow and a young girl frances and globe -- rover leave and make some enormous amount of money and cleveland takes care of the widow and the young girl, pays for them and sets them up in a nice home, best friend and former law p
and law school and immediately entered the navy where he received the purple heart for his service in the pacific theater. the immediacy of his experience has made him a man that was dedicated to making every feasible effort to achieve peace. after he was discharged at the end of the war key worked at newsweek magazine, and in that job came into contact with joseph kennedy sr., who asked him to manage the merchandise in chicago. during the chicago years, he married the daughter eunice in 1953 and chaired the chicago school board in the catholic interracial council as a supporter of desegregation of the city schools. shriver's prominence in the commercial and social life of the state soon lead to interest on the part of the political leaders to nominate him for governor of illinois. but by then, his brother-in-law, john kennedy, was running for president. shriver served us kennedy's chair for illinois and also head of the campaign civil rights division. in that capacity, leading a campaign, he convinced kennedy to telephone caruthers scott king in the matter of his imprisonment on t
in the united states is due to this one particular law passed in the 980s. -- 1980s. okay, then how does that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, how he sees it is he said, look, the big drivers are probably these economic forces, but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces has exacerbated them. so even as you have these economic forces creating much, much more concentration at
that the affordable care act will begin to become fully finalized to law over the next couple of years. we keep hearing those on the conservative side or republicans raise concerns about what we'll do for the country. what is your view. now you're not part profit excess. you can speak more freely. is it going to be a good thing for the country? >> yes, it will. for one reason, as an example, right now we have 50 some billion dollars a year of uncompensated care. that means people don't have insurance don't have medicaid, medicare or private insurance, don't have military coverage or anything like that, so they are not insured. they have access to health care in the emergency rooms. if they taken in and can't pay and don't go through a bankruptcy or something like that, that costs that care doesn't just go away. it's shifted over to the rest of the us who have insurance. that's $50 billion. now, you stop and think about that it could be as much as $1500 per person who pay for those who don't. when you have everybody in the system, all insured one way or another, that uncompensated care goes away
, physically recognized by law which they become husband-and-wife. but. but why today's society, and accepting society sisto richart between men and women? people have partnerships and are not allowed to be asserted as has been our wife and although marriage isn't for everyone, shouldn't it be something everyone can decide to? how could she feel if you couldn't bear the person you love? the first is not driven in 2001 in the last, argentina 2010. 10 countries in 11 years isn't that exciting. love is the natural human emotion. why should the of the person you love change anything? why should we let authority to take her society can and can't get married? we as a society have a moral and social obligation to challenge abuse against gay people. make nsr campaign were serious against discrimination. it's against the law to discriminate. is there hypocrisy in our law? last year alone over 65% of, gay and young women. one fifth of and people try to take their own life and 19% of the community felt discriminated against because of their sexuality. we need to work together to change this to your desk
of the arizona law that's derided by some as the papers, please, law. and he's against the original dream act. and so those are positions that he will be pressed about as his national profile rises and that he'll have to reconcile if he wants to scoop up a whole lot of hispanic votes and bring them to the republican party. >> host: mr. roig-franzia, the mormon aspect of marco rubio's childhood, what did you discover about that, and can you walk us through that? >> guest: it's so interesting that he has a mormon background at all. and when he was being talked about as a possible vice presidential candidate, some people were saying, wow, could it be an all-mormon ticket? because mitt romney was mormon. that's a little bit of an overgeneralization there. here's the situation. marco rubio was born catholic, grew up in miami, and his family moved to las vegas. they moved to las vegas because he had an aunt and uncle who lived there. his mother's sister. and this is a pattern that we see with immigrants. they follow tear family members -- their family members, right? so it was logical when they wer
the burmese people live under a fully democratic government that is transparent and respect the rule of law we must continue to push for reform. suu kyi said in oslo she accepted the nobel peace prize, quote, the piece of the world is as long as negative forces, the better forces anywhere for all at risk. every citizen of the world including those who live in the most free and safest conditions of the debt of gratitude to the helpful souls who put their lives on the line for democracy and freedom. there is no better example of that than the guest we have here today. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the united states secretary of state, the hon. hillary rodham clinton. [applause] >> 17 years ago, as we were in beijing on behalf of the un conference concerning the rights of women, we fought about many of the women around the world who could not be with us but whose presence was a strong message of the values that we were promoting, values that were not just american values but universal values. madeleine albright left that conference in beijing, taking with harry poster signed by all the amer
% of the boat. the government agrees -- there's a lot, under greek law whatever party comes in first, take a step back, greece has proportional representation that deserves a word of comment. proportional representation is the peculiar idea that if you get a certain percentage of the vote in an election, you should have the same percentage of delegates in congress that right the laws. it you didn't do that you exclude the 18% that had a role to play in governing which you think is the idea. in european countries we have proportional representation. if you get more than usually a cut off of 5% to get whatever the percentage of your vote is that is how many seats you get. you all understand i assume we don't do that in united states. if you get 51% of the vote you get it all and 49% wage. we have had proportional representation in the united states in the past. when you read about primary, and they a gets 20 delegates for the convention and candidate b, that is proportional, they get an equal number of delegates, we actually recognized in the united states proportional representation, we jus
are disenfranchised by new sets of law, but just a decade before two decades before your something like 1500 african-americans serving across the country at various levels is local, state and federal offices. 14 congressmen, two senators, lieutenant governors. it's really powerful. for the kenai tremendous opportunity and promise in the future and so much changes so quickly. it makes me think about her own moment and wonder how fragile is progress. >> when i was at the newberry, i was looking for michelle obama's ancestors. one other thing as kerry says whether i could find out who is the first person in the family to vote. it was a hopeless quest. but i was in the newberry library, a lovely library in chicago and i stumbled across a book that had voter registrations from the 1860s from north carolina. and i look do not book and no jumpers. and i thought it my father, he's from north carolina. otherwise, my great great great grandfather, who in 1867 40 years old, two years free registered to vote. he was approved as a voter.
you do anything, a law, with a carbon tax or a cap-and-trade program or through some other mechanism that can actually give people a sense of what our tech choices are instead of having people say maybe scientists have something in an act or not unceremoniously. small steps to provide us with opportunities to change the dialogue. >> we at "usa today" gallup poll that came back on monday. a third of republicans, not a nurse when they asked their ideology call themselves moderates or liberals. a third of the party. in this particular poll for the first time, republicans lost enthusiasm advantage in the presidential race in the reason was because declining enthusiasm. so there's not a republican in washington who describe themselves as a moderate or liberal, but the third of republicans in the country do. >> just to allays this point, rahm emanuel i say the republican party steeply provided to turn this small government land and no government land. there is a truth that not far. i am told we are now at our time. i want mickey to come back with a few closing comments. a part of this but
. jefferson himself said that the duty of a magistrate is to the line of the law, but it is not the highest duty. that the survival and success of the country is your highest obligation. one person's imperial president i is another person's hero. one person's tyranny is another person's brilliant reform. part of what we have to struggle with from age to age in america is realizing that some generations there's going to be an excess of power useed in a way -- used in a way in which we approve, and in some generations there's going to be an excess of power used in ways which we would fight to the death against. but that's the way history has unfolded. and jefferson was on the right side of that in the very beginning. i want to talk about three quick lessons that i think all of us can, particularly our second term, early second term president might be able to take from jefferson. one goes to louisiana which is you need to be daring. jefferson understood that the political clock wasn't like a normal clock, it moved faster. ing as the president's clock ticks even in a first term, everybody else
obamacare for her. spent and this is for my mother-in-law. we take very good care of the women. >> this corrects the history on 200 years. >> what a pleasure. keep up the great work. >> thank you so much. thank you for coming. hello. >> [inaudible] >> or he will take his job. >> there you go. [inaudible] >> how do you know kelly? >> [inaudible] >> you are here in d.c.? >> yeah, yeah. >> she is my favorite surgeon. it really nice to meet you. stay on this side. if we start a trend it will take too long. and by the way, my handwriting was a little worse because i was writing while i was taking the picture. did it come out of? >> i have no idea. >> you're going to love it. thank you. >> i have to, one for me, one for my and. -- my aunt. >> did i spell that wrong? >> no, that's perfect. >> thank you. thank you for coming. >> yeah. >> keep them moving here. >> hi, my name is john. >> nice to meet you, john. [inaudible] >> it's a timely book, that's why there's a few typos in it. your name is john? >> john. >> so why did you leave oklahoma? there's a lot of oil out there. you just ca
in the development of international refugee law policy. the international office of refugees who won the 1938 nobel peace prize. he yearns to -- diaspora and he was the russians could do something that can to the inspiring recent flight across the atlantic. in 1928 he decided it was up to him to do a tattered to mail in equivalent to go around the world alone by bicycle. luckily he didn't have to do that. he departed shanghai on a better bicycle but upgraded to a new bicycle in bangkok into a secondhand motorcycle in singapore. the benefactor gave him a brand-new aeriel motorcycle in karachi plus a letter the guaranteed parts and assistance in aerial offices around the world. in his published a county think the worldwide services of the ymca ,-com,-com ma shell oil and the firestone company and he depended on the global availability of gasoline, oil and food. the array of industry of good services that were now spread almost everywhere in the world. like the circumspect wing south asian diaspora he made his transit with think richmond of scattered white russians. above all there was his passport fo
at home and a reference and a baby yesterday the rotunda in here again today as a young kid in law school, listening to danny's speech at the democratic national convention. it seemed like it was the only voice of reason that broke through this god-awful cloud. and he stood there with such absolute confidence and certitude in the midst of all that was going on, like what he had to just self-evident. how could anybody doubt what he said? he was, in my 36 years in the senate more trusted by his colleagues that any man or woman i ever served with. i remember when the church committee decided the intelligence community was out of control and we needed intelligence community. i remember being part of, as a young kid because mike mansfield rockne and to keep engaged. compared to the discussion was due at state committee? and there was no discussion. this is like so-and-so or. it was danny too. no discussion to the best of my recollection, virtually none. when it came time to deal with watergate, there is a combination of danny inouye, sam ervin and howard baker. the only person among whom there
. in early december 1846, a few months after he arrives in mexico he wrote his law partner, there is not an acre in 500 here that a man in the lamar would pay taxes on. the people of mexico were far worse. i've never seen a drop in mexican. that is the only bit -- good thing i can say about them. few intelligent men who were over the rest. as many slaves as the gross in the south. treachery, deceit, and stealing. it would make a measurable addition to any portion of the population of the united states. to another friend he wrote a week later that the only difference between the beyonce mexico and the slaves of the south is their color. he says, as for making them voters and citizens of the united states, it should not be thought up until we give all indians about. although i was for annexing of this part of mexico, and act out it's worth it. pardons' evolution from this abbott expansionists to a xenophobic senate of the world was a rapid want, but it was not uncommon. his views were shared by many in the army. midwesterners initially shared the most enthusiasm for the war i
security law. a co-editor of the book and four contributors discuss cyber warfare and the future of military detention. this is a little under two hours. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming friday afternoon. i am the chair of advisory on law and national security.
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